Mama points out that something has come between her and her children and Walter notes the same is happening between him and Ruth. These divisions are only seen to be overcome at the end of the play when they finally, and jointly, agree to move to Clybourne Park with pride. Their unity is seen to transcend the barriers and this becomes a weapon to challenge the divisive effects of poverty and inherent racism. Oftentimes, seemingly minor characters can actually have great significance to either the meaning or the actions of the play. InA Raisin in the Sunthere is a handful of minor characters, including George and Joseph, who are significant to the play. Choose one or more of the minor characters inA Raisin in the Sunand write an essay in which you analyze the roles that they play in the development of the thematic content ofA Raisin in the Sun.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

To answer this question we must take into account more than history and documents, we must evaluate the essence, the soul of the creator, of the term paper writing service English man. Andrew Crawley describes in his book , the English people as be… JudaismJudaism Broadly speaking one could trace the history of Judaism back to the early religion of Israel, the religion that produced the Hebrew Scriptures that are known to Christians as the Old Testament. Here, however, we take Judaism to refer to the religion that was known to Jesus and his contemporaries, and that was later developed and formulated by the Rabbis. The year in which the Jerusalem Temple was destroyed by the Romans. In A Raisin In The Sun, by Lorraine Hansberry, she introduces us to an African American family who has to endure poverty.

Raisin In The Sun A Dream Deferred

The mom may have three or four kids; the boys in the family may be involved in gangs because they don’t have a dad in the house; and mom may have two jobs because she only makes the minimum wage and can’t buy enough food on just one job. There are a lot of people who just barely make it from paycheck to paycheck. So don’t be fooled, I would say to that man, because even though life is a lot better than it was in 1959, there are still a lot of problems and many black families still struggle. Okay, what would he say, how would he react, to seeing a Raisin in the Sun, if he were to see it today on Broadway? I can imagine he would enjoy it a lot, but he would probably think to himself, there aren’t that many black folks who have to live in squalor like that anymore. Thank God, he would say to himself, life has gotten better for most black families.

Several minor characters have a major impact on the story and serve an important function within the play. Choose minor characters and show their significance and how they serve to further elevate a theme. Consider George Murchison, Joseph Asagai, the neighbor, Mrs. Johnson, Mr. Karl Linder, and/or Willy Harris. Write an essay in which you identify the gender dynamics in the play, considering whether the gender roles are as rigid or scripted as they appear to be.

  • Mr. Lindner believes he is doing the Youngers a favor as he tries to persuade them not to move into the all White neighborhood.
  • Women are not considered for material wealth as they are expected to better the life of their families.
  • Also, Mama disagrees with the plan because it is against religion.
  • The play remains a potent touchstone, still speaking to viewers about race, gender roles, family, hope and desperation, capitalism, the American dream and so much more.
  • In 2012, when the new study was conducted, the vast majority of testers of all races were able to at least make an appointment to see a recently advertised house or apartment.
  • With the newly arrived check, the Younger family became ecstatic with the knowledge that their lives would change for the better.

Hansberry also shows us how the Younger’s members of the family value money the most, While their mother tries to show them the… The American Dream is the belief that anyone can accomplish their own version of success in a society where the capacity of rising to a higher social or economic position is possible for everyone. Everyone interprets the American Dream in their own way, for some,… This is correct, but upon further examination one finds there is a deeper, more universal message among the prose…personal empowerment. The most obvious thing about this story was that nothing really happened.

Themes

For instance, when Travis asks for fifty cents, Walter gives his son twice money as much as he asks for. The name of Hansberry’s play makes a direct mention of the the Langston Hughes poem, “A Dream Deferred.” “what goes on to a dream deferred?” asked Hughes. The feeling of ambition that Beneatha once had for becoming a doctor turned into feelings of impossibility. She often mentions the words “used to” emphasizing that her dreams of becoming the cure, the doctor, and someone who cares have now become a part of the past. She is someone who genuinely cares about people and becoming a doctor was only intended as a way for her to help more people who were hurting.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

She wanted them to live a better life and so she moved them into a house that was spacious and were Travis didn’t have to sleep on the couch and were they didn’t have to take turns for the shower with other people outside their family. Her kids wanted to do other things with the money but she knew it would be best if she used the money towards a house instead of purchasing a liquor store and medical school. While questions of race are certainly prominent in the play, an equally significant, if less prominent, issue involves gender. Mama understands that in order to experience himself as an adult, Walter must experience himself as a man—that is, he must be the leader of a family. Of course, in order for Walter to be the leader, the women must step back. And even within their stations as servants, Walter and Ruth’s roles are further divided according to their sex—Walter is the chauffeur, Ruth the domestic servant.

More Related Essays

Whether or not Ruth will actually decide on an abortion is debatable, for Ruth says to Mama in Act I, “Ain’t no thin’ can tear at you like losin’ your baby.” Ruth says this as Mama is recounting the pain of having lost her own baby, Claude. At this point in the play, Ruth’s pregnancy has not yet been verified, but the dialogue spawned write my assignment by the abortion controversy in this drama is as relevant today as it was in 1959, when the play opened. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter.